Many people use marijuana at levels that cause abuse or addiction despite significant risks such as depression, schizophrenia and other forms of psychoses and increased risk of heart attack. People addicted to marijuana are also at higher risk for various mental health problems, respiratory diseases and short term memory loss. Marijuana users who try to quit experience similar symptoms that cigarette smokers experience such as irritability, anxiety, insomnia and depression. Many researchers have pointed to higher potency as a possible reason for skyrocketing treatment admissions rates globally for cannabis. A key ingredient in marijuana, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), is responsible for users feeling “high” and at higher levels is responsible for more harmful health effects. Today’s marijuana is 4-5 times stronger than marijuana of the 60’s and 70’s. Tolerance of and withdrawal from marijuana and THC develop with regular use. Marijuana use is common among young people. In 2015, more than 11 million young adults, ages 18-25 used marijuana in the last year. A key indicator that is associated with youth use is perception harm. Research shows a relationship between legalization of marijuana for medical use and/or recreational use and youth’s perception of harm. Young people’s belief that consistent marijuana use is risky, is decreasing.

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Ways you can advocate marijuana prevention…

Prevent Youth Marijuana Use